New Age History and Economics

The Day We See The Truth And Cease To Speak it, Is The Day We Begin To Die. MLK Jr.

Thursday, January 1, 2015

Who is a Hindu?

Lies being Taught; 
Hindu refers to followers of Sanatan Dharm or Ram/Krishan Bhakts only.

Now the truth;
The word Hindu refers to the original inhabitants of ancient (H)Indus valley Civilization. ‘Hinduš’ was Old Persian name of the’ Indus River’, cognate with Sanskrit word ‘Sindhu’. By about 2nd - 1st century BCE, the term "Hein-tu" was used by Chinese, for referring to Indian people. The Persian term was loaned into Arabic as ‘al-Hind’ referring to the land of the people who live across river ‘Indus’, and into Greek as ‘Indos’, whence ultimately English word ‘India’. Thus the word ‘India’ itself is cognate with the word ‘Hindu’. 

The word "Hindu" denote to persons professing any of the religions which originated in ancient India known as ‘Indies’. The ancient India or indies consists of present day Afghanistan, Pakistan, Nepal, India, Bangladesh, Bhutan, Maldives, Sri Lanka, Myanmar, the Maldives and some parts of Indonesia, Thailand, Cambodia, Laos, Vietnam, Brunei, Singapore, the Philippines, East Timor, and Malaysia.
 Source; Indies

Hindu refers to an identity associated with the philosophical, religious and cultural systems that are indigenous to the Indian subcontinent. India has multitude of religions and religious ceremonies. India is a country where every 100 Miles language and religious ceremony changes.  At every few miles there is a Mahatama, A Sant, A Baba, A Swami, A Muni, A Guru, An Ashram, A Dera, A Satsang givinh his own beliefs, practices, traditions and religious definitions. Even within same caste or sub castes for example Baniyas or Vaishyas known as “Aggarwals” the religious ceremony changes with place it is different in Bengal where Vaishyas worship ‘Durga’ in West they worship ‘Ganesha’ in central India they worship ‘Sun’ (chhath Puja). Hindu Dharma refers to moral obligations or duties to be observed in Society e.g. 'Pitr'/'matr' Dharma; father/mother duty towards children, 'Suntaan' dharam duty of sons or children’s towards tjeir parents or 'Shishya' and 'Shikshak' students and teachers duty towards each other. In other words;-   
"Obedience must be rendered to mother and father, likewise to elders; kindness must be shown towards animals, truth must be spoken, pupil must show reverence to the master, and master be benevolent towards student. Likewise one must behave in a respectfully towards relatives and take care of their guests”.Happiness in this world and in the other world is difficult to secure without great love of morality, careful examination, great obedience, and great fear of sin.”

After Ashoka the great laid down arms for good (for war was considered as greatest destruction a man could cause) See; Ashoka the great, India ceased to be a military power. It became easy prey for invasions. Muslim invaders, such as Nader Shah, Mahmud of Ghazni, Ahmad Shāh Abdālī, Muhammad Ghori, Babur etc forced or lured, many inhabitants to convert to Islam. However cultures of converts remained as Hindus. They are called Hindu-Muslims since Islam is not indigenous to India. Similarly English and Portuguese invasion led to many to convert to Christianity. However they are also culturally Hindus. Hence converts to Christianity are called Hindu-Christians since Christianity is not indigenous to India. Hindus who converted to Islam whether living in Pakistan or Bangladesh or truncated India are not called Muslims for two reasons;
1.     They speak Urdu. Urdu is derived from Hindi and is spoken only by Hindus or in Indian territories of Pakistan or Bangladesh. Source; https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Urdu
        One can easily follow Pakistan news channels since they use mostly Hindi with little smattering of Persian. We cannot understand Muslim TV Channels of Saudi Arabia, Iran or Iraq.

2.     Muslims consider Indian converts as their Dogs not Muslims;-
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tC5B3dHSydI

Indian Muslims can be referred to either as converts or Hindu-Muslims. They are not Muslims and will never be accepted as Muslims. 
The notion of grouping hundreds of the indigenous religions of India under a single umbrella term 'Hindu' emerges as a result of various invasions in India bringing forth non-indigenous religions such as Islam to the Indian Subcontinent.  Numerous Muslim invaders, such as Nader Shah, Mahmud of Ghazni, Ahmad Shāh Abdālī, Muhammad Ghori, Babur and Aurangzeb, destroyed Hindu temples and persecuted local inhabitants who were uniformly called ‘Hindus’. These invaders forced or lured, many inhabitants to convert to Islam. They have same culture as Hindus, but called Hindu-Muslims since Islam is not indigenous to India. Similarly English and Portuguese invasion led to many to convert to Christianity. However they are also culturally same as Hindus. Hence converts to Christianity are called Hindu-Christians since Christianity is not indigenous to India.  

The development of Hindu religion and philosophy shows that from time to time saints and religious reformers attempted to remove from the Hindu thought and practices elements of corruption and superstition and that sometimes also led to the formation of different sects. Buddha started Buddhism; Mahavir founded Jainism; Basava became the founder of Lingayat religion, Dnyaneshwar and Tukaram initiated the Varakari Cult; Guru nanak inspired Sikhism; Dayananda founded Arya Samaj, and Chaitanya began Bhakti cult; and as a result of the teachings of Ramakrishna and Vivekananda, Hindu religion flowered into its most attractive, progressive and dynamic form. If we study the teachings of these saints and religious reformers, we would notice an amount of divergence in their respective views; but underneath that divergence, there is a kind of subtle indescribable unity which keeps them within the sweep of the broad and progressive Hindu religion. Religious Thought & Life in India" by Monier Williams.

In Encyclopaedia Britannica (15th Edition), the term `Hinduism' has been defined as meaning "the civilization of Hindus (originally, the inhabitants of the land of the Indus River). It properly denotes the Indian civilization of approximately the last 2,000 years, which gradually evolved from Vedism, the religion of the ancient Indo-European who settled in India in the last centuries of the 2nd millennium BC. Because it integrates a large variety of heterogeneous elements, Hinduism constitutes a very complex but largely continuous whole, and since it covers the whole of life, it has religious, social, economic, literary, and artistic aspects. As a religion, Hinduism is an utterly diverse conglomerate of doctrines, cults, and way of life.... In principle, Hinduism incorporates all forms of belief and worship without necessitating the selection or elimination of any. The Hindu is inclined to revere the divine in every manifestation, whatever it may be, and is doctrinally tolerant, leaving others - including both Hindus and non-Hindus - whatever creed and worship practices suit them best. A Hindu may embrace a non-Hindu religion without ceasing to be a Hindu, and since the Hindu is disposed to think synthetically and to regard other forms of worship, strange gods, and divergent doctrines as adequate rather than wrong or objectionable, he tends to believe that the highest divine powers complement each other for the well-being of the world and mankind. Few religious ideas are considered to be finally irreconcilable. The core of religion does not even depend on the existence or non-existence of God or on whether there is one god or many. Since religious truth is said to transcend all verbal definition, it is not conceived in dogmatic terms. Hinduism is. then both a civilization and a conglomerate of religions, with neither a beginning, a founder, nor a central authority, hierarchy, or organization. Every attempt at a specific definition of Hinduism has proved unsatisfactory in one way or another, the more so because the finest Indian scholars of Hinduism, including Hindus themselves, have emphasized different aspects of the whole".

         In Bhagwan Koer v. J.C. Bose & Ors., (1904 ILR 31 Cal. 11), it was held that Hindu religion is marvelously catholic and elastic. Its theology is marked by eclecticism and tolerance and almost unlimited freedom of private worship. .....

    This being the scope and nature of the religion, it is not strange that it holds within its fold men of divergent views and traditions which have very little in common except a vague faith in what may be called the fundamentals of the Hindu religion."
       This being the scope and nature of the religion, it is not strange that it holds within its fold men of divergent views and traditions which have very little in common except a vague faith in what may be called the fundamentals of the Hindu religion."


    In 1995, Chief Justice P. B. Gajendragadkar was quoted in an Indian Supreme Court ruling:-
“When we think of the Hindu religion, unlike other religions in the world, the Hindu religion does not claim any one prophet; it does not worship any one god; it does not subscribe to any one dogma; it does not believe in any one philosophic concept; it does not follow any one set of religious rites or performances; in fact, it does not appear to satisfy the narrow traditional features of any religion or creed. It may broadly be described as a way of life and nothing more.”

In Hindu nationalism, the term "Hindu" combines notions of geographical unity, common culture and common race. Thus, Veer Savarkar in his influential pamphlet "Hindutva: Who is a Hindu?" defined a Hindu as a person who sees India "as his Fatherland as well as his Holy land, that is, the cradle land of his religion". Link 

Kaps

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