New Age History and Economics

The Day We See The Truth And Cease To Speak it, Is The Day We Begin To Die. MLK Jr.

Thursday, October 11, 2012

Germany or Hitler were never Racist



Lies being Taught;
Hitler was racist. During 1936 Berlin Olympics, He refused to shake the hand of the American Black athlete Jesse Owens after the latter had won a race, because Jesse Owens was Black.
He put Jews in concentration camps which proves he was racist.
Now the Truth;
        One of the famous American 'Tuskegee Airmen', Alexander Jefferson, wrote a book called 'Red Tail Captured, Red Tail Free' where he talks about being a second class citizen in his own country. He was shot down and put into a German P.O.W. camp where for the first time in his life he wasn't segregated from the white troops. He recalls the incredible irony of finally being freed and returning home and no sooner did he walk off the ship when he was told 'Whites to the right, niggers to the left'!
         The brilliant black historian and sociologist W.E.B. Du Bois visited National Socialist Germany in 1936. He related that he received more respect from the German academics then from his white colleagues back in America. He was treated like a human being in Germany, and stated: 'The National Socialists did not show any trace of racial hatred toward blacks.' Society under Nazis was completely integrated.
Owens said, "Hitler didn't snub me – it was FDR who snubbed me. The president didn't even send me a telegram." On the other hand, Hitler sent Owens a commemorative inscribed cabinet photograph of himself. Jesse Owens was never invited to the White House nor were honors bestowed upon him by President Franklin D. Roosevelt (FDR) or his successor Harry S. Truman during their terms though they did meet many other American medalists.
       Germany was never racist. Owens was allowed to travel with and stay in the same hotels in Germany as whites, while at the time blacks in many parts of the United States had to stay in segregated hotels while traveling. After a New York City ticker-tape parade of Fifth Avenue in his honor, Owens had to ride the freight elevator at the Waldorf-Astoria to reach the reception honoring him.
       The reason why Hitler could not shake hands with Jesse Owens is that Hitler had personally attended the first day of the track and field competition on 2 August 1936, and did personally congratulate the German athlete Hans Woellke, who became the first German to win a gold medal in the Olympics since 1896.Throughout the rest of the day, Hitler continued to receive Olympic champions, German and non German, in his VIP box.
   The next day, 3 August, the chairman of the International Olympic Committee, Comte Baillet-Latour, approached Hitler early in the morning and told the German leader that he had violated Olympic protocol by having winners paraded to his box.
     Hitler apologized and gave an undertaking that he would from then on refrain from publicly congratulating any winners, German or otherwise. During this day, Owens won his gold medals - and in line with the Olympic Committee's ruling, Hitler did not shake his hand, or anybody else's for that matter, at the games again.
        On reports that Hitler had deliberately avoided acknowledging his victories, and had refused to shake his hand, Owens said at the time:
     "Hitler had a certain time to come to the stadium and a certain time to leave". "It happened he had to leave before the victory ceremony after the 100 meters. But before he left I was on my way to a broadcast and passed near his box. He waved at me and I waved back. I think it was 'bad taste' to criticize the man of the hour in another country”
          Owens Arrives With Kind Words For All Officials – The Pittsburgh Press, 24 August 1936. News.google.co.uk. Retrieved on 2011-09-15.
Sources;
Schaap, Jeremy (2007). Triumph: The untold story of Jesse Owens and Hitler’s Olympics. New York: Mifflin Harcourt.
Owens Weighs his pro offers – The Baltimore Sun, August 18, 1936.

George Takei, of Star Trek fame, was one of the many victims of American racist policy. Here's his account of his experience in American concentration camps during WWII:
        ’I was only a child when soldiers with bayonetted rifles marched up our driveway, banged on our door, and ordered us out. I remember my mother's tears as we gathered what little we could carry, and then were sent to live for many weeks in a single cramped horse stall. Our bank accounts were frozen, our businesses shuttered, and our homes with most of our belongings were left behind, all because of what we looked like.'
        'A few months later, we were shipped off to the swamps, over a thousand miles away, by railcar. They placed in all one hundred twenty thousand of us inside barbed wire fences, machine guns pointed down at us from watch towers. We slept inside bug-infested barracks, ate in a noisy mess hall, and relieved ourselves in common latrines that had no walls between the stalls. We were denied adequate medicines, shelter and supplies. I remember as a child looking up toward a U.S. flag in the room, as we recited the Pledge of Allegiance, those ironic words echoing, "with liberty, and justice for all."'
        Executive Order 9066, signed by President Franklin Delano Roosevelt, was issued on the premise that anyone of Japanese descent could not be trusted and was to be treated as an enemy, even those of us who were American citizens, born in this land. We were viewed not as individual people, but as a yellow menace to be dealt with, and harshly. The guns pointed at us at every point reminded us that if we so much as tried to stand up for our dignity, there would be violent consequences. The order and the ensuing confinement was an egregious violation of the constitution and of due process as we were held, without trial and without charge, awaiting our fate.'


Thursday, October 4, 2012

You can make a difference.




One song can spark a moment,
One flower can wake the dream.

One tree can start a forest,
One bird can herald spring.

One smile begins a friendship,
One handclasp lifts a soul.

One star can guide a ship at sea,
One word can frame the goal.

One vote can change a nation,
One sunbeam lights a room.

One candle wipes out darkness,
One laugh will conquer gloom.

One step must start each journey,
One word must start each prayer.

One hope will raise our spirits,
One touch can show you care.

One voice can speak with wisdom,
One heart can know what's true.

One life can make the difference
IT'S UP TO the one, you!

Monday, October 1, 2012

Quotes on Central Banks.


On the Central Banks
“I sincerely believe that banking institutions are more dangerous to our liberties than standing armies. The issuing power should be taken from the banks and restored to the people to whom it properly belongs.”Thomas Jefferson (3rd US President)

“This institution, having no principle but that of avarice, will never be varied in its object… to engross all the wealth, power and influence of the state.”William Findley (US House Representative from Pennsylvania)

“If the American people ever allow private banks to control the issue of their currency, first by inflation, then by deflation, the banks and the corporations which grow up around them will deprive the people of all property until their children wake up homeless on the continent their fathers conquered.”Thomas Jefferson (3rd US President)
 
“Whosoever controls the volume of money in any country is absolute master of all industry and commerce… And when you realize that the entire system is very easily controlled, one way or another, by a few powerful men at the top, you will not have to be told how periods of inflation and depression originate.” – James Garfield (20th US President)
 
“The powers of financial capitalism had [a] far-reaching [plan], nothing less than to create a world system of financial control in private hands able to dominate the political system of each country and the economy of the world as a whole. This system was to be controlled in a feudalist fashion by the central banks of the world acting in concert, by secret agreements arrived at in frequent meetings and conferences… Each central bank… Sought to dominate its government by its ability to control treasury loans, to manipulate foreign exchanges, to influence the level of economic activity in the country, and to influence cooperative politicians by subsequent economic rewards in the business world.” – Carroll Quigley (Georgetown University professor and Bill Clinton’s mentor)